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View Latest Scams

Job Mail, like most online entities, gets effected by scammers or ill-intentioned individuals. We try our level best to maintain fair, good and productive operations, without having to deal with those who have negative agendas.

Usually, a scammer will try to extract information or money from his/her victims. This is carried out in many creative ways. It is sometimes so believable that even the most vigilant get sold on a bad transaction.

One of the actions that we take to ensure that you get the best possible employment advertisements is our “Verified by Job Mail” status. If you see this status on an advertisement, you know that we have verified the legitimacy of the advertisement. Since we proofread all ads within 24 hours, you can be sure that you are getting fresh, relevant, and safe content. Always look for the   symbol.

It is important to remember that in the context of the job sector, you should only exchange your professional profile and wait for correspondence that indicates a job interview or assessment.

No money should be exchanged this early in the process. Furthermore, it is important to make certain that you are dealing with accredited companies who have a proven track record of their dealings with people. The internet is a great resource for this.

Always ask questions and remember: you have contributed yourself to potential success-you have the right to inquire about procedures and processes.

Below, we have compiled a list that is continuously updated of the profiles of scams that are most commonly used to usurp or hinder safe and successful systems of exchange.

Name of Scam: 086 scams
Date first reported: 10 October 2011
Description of scam: Description: The employer indicates that all materials (CV, application letter, qualification certificates, etc.) must be faxed to a number that begins with 086. If the number is anything other than 086 0XX XXXX, the jobseeker is then charged per page for the fax transmission.
Preventative measures: All legitimate employers should give you the option to email the materials to them.

Name of Scam: International Positions
Date first reported: 12 April 2010
Description of scam: A scammer will utilise all communication mediums to access and control assurance in his/her offering. After the initial application, victims are alerted via sms with very impressive confirmations, with inquiry telephone numbers. Users are often given a job prospect overseas, and asked to pay a stamp duty to process a job application.
Preventative measures: Be weary of what the offering asks of you. You should never be required to pay a fee before any proper contact is made. Do not pay monies to any entity that has pre-mature requests of your very personal information and details or funds.

Name of Scam: Uniform Scam
Date first reported: 08 June 2011
Description of scam: Beware of the so-called "Uniform Scam" This scam starts by someone advertising a security position (or another position where a uniform is required). The person will offer an above average salary. Once the prospective Jobseeker contacts them to inquire about the so-called position they will be told that they have the position and that they need to pay an amount for uniforms.

The scammer will then request that the job seeker make an appearance at their office a few days later. Once the job seeker arrives for his new position at "their office", the persons in the office will known absolutely nothing about the position.

Note that: Jobseeker should insist on a one-on-one interview and demand to see the premises where they will be working to make sure they are not being scammed. They must not pay anything or even hand over their documents unless they are satisfied the prospective employer is legitimate

Any Candidate being asked for payment of any kind when being invited by an Agency for an interview should immediately turn it down. Agencies who charge any kind of Fee, be it Admin or Registration, should be reported to Job Mail or the SAPS immediately.Nowhere during the recruitment process is a job-seeker supposed to pay the prospective employer.

Name of Scam: Prolonged Ads
Date first reported: 26 November 2006
Description of scam: Old Ads are still displayed, receiving interest from parties who deem it feasible. Applicants are then asked to produce personal information and banking fees.
Preventative measures: Look at the authenticity of the ads. Look for detail or lack thereof that makes the ad relate its actual authenticity. Note that you should not be required to relay personal fees and information to the entity.

Name of Scam: Classic Language and Terminology
Date first reported: 15 April 2009
Description of scam: The scammer utilises the wording and terminology of a professional recruitment company. He then advises the victim to complete the contract with detailed personal information.
Preventative measures: No company will ask that you complete a contract before you are interviewed. Be weary of unusual pre-mature requests for your personal information or money.

Name of Scam: Puffed Up Prospects
Date first reported: August 2009
Description of scam: The company will portray a very high-end professional stance and make the interview process seem intricate and phase based. However, the end result is a job or vacancy that requires a completely different job spec e.g. Door to Door selling etc.
Preventative measures: Always check for track records and authentic systems of operation from the company. Utilises communication mediums like the internet to check up on who you are contributing your time and efforts to.

Name of Scam: AU Pair
Date first reported: November 2009
Description of scam: Good prospective work in the Au Pair industry if offered, with strong attention to a stable position. The scam requires the users to do money transfers to safe-guard or secure a possible place.
Preventative measures: Do not transfer funds or fees to in any initial phase of hiring.

Name of Scam: Steeling profiles
Date first reported: 12 January 2010
Description of scam: The scammer will utilise the names or brands of successful hiring or recruitment houses. This is done completely through formal email copy and structure.
Preventative measures: Look at domain names: @thename.co.za does the domain name relate to the proposed offering and content? Be weary to read the source of the email message. Check and authenticate who you conduct business with. The scammer will also answer the phone using the name of the stolen profile. Be vigilant of all these factors and report anything that your may feel uncomfortable with.

Name of Scam: Complete Professionalism
Date first reported: 12 April 2010
Description of scam: A scammer will utilise all communication mediums to access and control assurance in his/her offering. After the initial application, victims are alerted via sms with very impressive confirmations, with inquiry telephone numbers. Users are often given a job prospect overseas, and asked to pay a stamp duty to process a job application.
Preventative measures: Be weary of what the offering asks of you. You should never be required to pay a fee before any proper contact is made. Do not pay monies to any entity that has pre-mature requests of your very personal information and details or funds.